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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
and abc's alex marquardt leads us off from egypt. >> reporter: this amateur video shows the moment the vacation of a lifetime turned into tragedy. a sunrise balloon ride suddenly enveloped in black smoke. you can see it billowing from the basket. then the balloon begins to collapse. deflated, it now plummets 1,000 feet down to the earth. photographer christopher michel watched it all unfold from another balloon. >> we heard a loud explosion and then a lot of smoke right behind us. and, you know, our first feeling was, it could. be a balloon, but it turned out actually to be, unfortunately, this tragic accident. >> reporter: we now know that at 7:00 a.m., the balloon was coming in for a landing in a sugar cane field. that's when one of its cables got caught on a helium canister and started a fire. a pilot and two others jumped from 40 feet up as the balloon then shot back into the sky, exploding into flames before crashing down. 19 lives were lost, including one of those who jumped. they were from hong kong, japan and across europe. it's a marvel to float in a balloon over luxor, fl
>>> this is "world news," and right now, millions of us are slipping and sliding across highways layered with treacherous ice. watch this bus go into a light post. cars trapped on highways or out of control and we report from the middle of the storm. >>> showdown, live from iran on the eve of nuclear talks, why some americans are being cheered by the iranians tonight and david muir is there. >>> real money. on oscar weekend we show you a new way to save a lot of cash on movie tickets and popcorn. >>> and our person of the week. >> thelma & louise ride again. >> i sit down with my friend robin roberts who tells all of us how to find the strength inside you don't even know you have. >> i feel strength like i have never felt before. >> good evening. as we come on the air this friday night, millions of people are trying to drive home on sheets of ice. the giant snowstorm still on the move. think of these images as a kind of sos, planes paralyzed, highways a danger zone. as one monster storm is winding down, another is powering up. abc's john schriffen is in minneapolis where streets
this morning skidded off the runway as it landed. and in kansas yesterday crews used plows and shovels to dig one plane out. and back here in minnesota, this is what they have to dig out of. and the roads, covered with layers of snow and ice. now, diane, there's another storm on the way set to hit the northeast this weekend. people in new england, bracing for similar conditions. >> all right, john, our thanks to you, and safe travel to everyone tonight. >>> and now the big news on oscar pistorius, the olympic star charged in the murder of his girlfriend. it's surprised a lot of people that he's free on bail tonight. why? and did his medical condition play a role? abc's bazi kanani tells us. >> reporter: oscar pistorius appeared tense and somber as he waited to learn whether he could go home. >> i've come to the conclusion that the accused has made a case to be released on bail. >> reporter: cries of relief from his family. >> we know oscar's version that is the truth and that will prevail in the coming court case. >> reporter: defense attorneys convinced the court pistorius is not a flight ri
's electric power grid. what about the american water supply? 1,000 spies at work tonight. what does the u.s. do next? brian ross is here. >>> his story. olympic athlete oscar pistorius in court today. tonight, what he says about why he shot his girlfriend. >>> made in america? could the next pope be from boston? meet the cardinal rising to the top of the list. >>> and, the secret of success. how to turn your family into a dynamic, happy team, making sure everyone wins. >>> good evening. a new report tonight lifts the veil on a kind of invisible war. china, unleashing its full spy power on american power grids and the wealth of american manufacturing. a new report even locates this building in shanghai. it doesn't look threatening, but what are they doing inside? and what does it mean for americ america's national security? here's abc's brian ross. >> reporter: the chinese people's liberation army is the biggest military force in the world, with more than 2 million soldiers. but it is the thousand or so in this nondescript building in shanghai that may pose the biggest threat to the u.s. thi
. this woman was walking with her two children when the blast hit. doctors told us she will likely lose both her legs. were you walking when the bomb went off? we saw a little boy recovering from surgery after debris tore through his body. his father, who was walking with him when the bomb went off, in tears, overcome with fear for his son's life. twice in the past year, rebels have tried to take damascus by storm and failed. now, it seems they will try to take it by terror, slowly choking the life out of one of the world's great cities to try to bring down the regime. diane? >> thank you, terry moran, reporting in tonight from a turbulent damascus. >>> and from damascus, we head now to iran. and a new, defiant challenge from that country, a country filled with nuclear ambition. and once again, abc's david muir is reporting live from tehran tonight. david? >> reporter: diane, good evening again from iran this evening. and we begin with that new u.n. report, the inspectors who say they discovered advanced centrifuges installed at one of iran's main nuclear facilities. they say it's proof that
that door, a pope chosen in the mysterious ritual known as the conclave. abc's david wright tells us about the ancient vote to come. >> reporter: before the cardinals file into the sistine chapel and lock the doors behind them, technicians will have pulled up the floorboards to install cell phone jamming devices. violating the secrecy is punishable by excommunication. >> it's a way of ensuring that the voice that's speaking to the cardinals during the conclave belongs to the holy spirit and to no one else. >> reporter: no one knows how long it will take. the shortest conclave lasted just a few hours. the longest? nearly three years. in fact, that's why they started locking the doors. in the middle ages, during the plague years, a conclave meeting in the town of viterbo took so long, frustrated villagers eventually locked the cardinals in to hurry them up. it didn't work, so they tried to starve them out. that didn't work. so, they exposed them to the elements, tearing the roof off the building to let the holy spirit in. not going to happen in the sistine chapel, where the ceiling is michel
jonathan karl tells us about the news today. >> reporter: by one count, president obama has already used unmanned cia drones to strike more than 300 suspected terrorist targets, even more than his predecessor. but today, we learned just how much authority the administration believes it has to kill, without trial or evidence, suspected terrorists, even american citizens. a newly disclosed justice department document says american citizens tied to al qaeda can be killed, if, "an informed, high-level official believes the target poses an imminent threat." but the document says it "does not require the government to have clear evidence." case in point, anwar al awlaki, an american citizen and top al qaeda leader, linked to several terrorist attacks. he was killed in a 2011 drone strike. human rights advocates say the justice department memo goes way too far. and -- >> justifies essentially a claim that the executive branch can be judge, jury and executioner. >> reporter: as soon as he became president, barack obama stopped cia tactics like waterboarding that he considered torture. but this j
his own legacy? >> well, this is the tremendous question that lies before us. i mean, there is no job description for a retired pope. >> reporter: so, benedict remains pope until the end of the month. the cardinals have to assemble here for a conclave to elect his successor within 20 days. that takes us to mid-march. which means that a billion catholics around the world should have a new pope by easter. diane? >> all right, jeffrey, thank you. and, of course, that new pope will have to face the call for change, from many people in the american catholic church. there are 77.7 million catholics here in the united states. nearly 1 in 4 of us is catholic. and rhode island, new jersey and massachusetts still have the highest concentration of catholics. but in sheer numbers, the biggest growth is among hispanics. and abc's cecilia vega spent the day gathering american reaction from all over. cecilia? >> reporter: diane, good evening. we're here at st. mary's cathedral in san francisco and as you said, we've been speaking with catholics all day long. and i will tell you, boy, the surprise do
cracked tonight. but can you trust the latest boom? >>> terror strike, suicide bombing at the u.s. embassy in turkey, is this the new plan of attack for terrorists? >>> breaking point, all those cars piling up on highways, tonight we learn giant trucks may be the trigger. we'll tell what you to do. >>> and the main event, meet the newest wobbly member of a show business dynasty. something surprising about the stars bred for the super bowl. >>> and a good evening to you this friday, we come on the air with a banner day on wall street, for the first time in five years wall street has cracked the 14,000 ceiling. and everyone is checking their retirement funds and asking, is tht signal that a boom is coming our way? abc's david muir is here to tell us is the roller coaster ride over in. >> finally over, great to see you. every economist i talked to had a smile on their face saying we're not completely there yet but this is a huge start, housing values coming back and 401(k) coming back and dow more at 14,000, not just a psychological barrier, tonight a real one. it was on the cable channels --
and passenger health. abc's matt gutman starts us off with what's happening right now, matt? >> reporter: from a boat in the mobile bay, moments ago, we learned one of the passengers aboard the ship suffered a stroke and had to be medevacked. check out the tug boats, trying to nudge that ship ideas a quarter mile channel. veering either way and it could ground. tonight they're doing that in the dark. >> reporter: tonight, with the lame colossus finally within sight of land, we get our first look inside -- the grim ship's log. >> been shipwrecked for three days. >> reporter: the hours long lines for food, after eight full days at sea -- five of them without power and sanitation. sewage seeping down walls, and this sandaled foot testing urine soaked carpets. the images showing shanty towns that sprang up on decks -- tent cities that carnival has denied existed. outside, the foot checkered with towels and bedding. some unfurling white banners. right there, above the lettering -- i carnival triumph -- those dressed for the tropics, huddling in bathrobes and blankets against the cold. the ship has
secrets from u.s. companies and hacking into government sites. >> this is an espionage operation run by the chinese people's liberation army and it's targeting a broad swath of western organizations. >> reporter: among the most troubling targets, american infrastructure sites, including water treatment plants, transportation control centers, pipelines and power grids. >> the only reason you would want to get into the control system for the power grid is to cause damage, destruction and disruption. >> reporter: among the many corporate targets of the chinese hackers, according to u.s. officials, lockheed martin, the country's largest defense contractor and the maker of the f-35 jet fighter. u.s. officials say, not surprisingly, the chinese version of the plane has some distinct similarities. >> it's costing, according to u.s. intelligence, hundreds of billions of dollars and thousands of u.s. jobs every year. >> reporter: the white house today confirmed the severity, although not the details, of the chinese cyber espionage. >> we have repeatedly raised our concerns at the highest leve
's gio benitez following it all for us. >> reporter: the little boy at the center of a week-long hostage standoff is in his mother's arm, and tonight, the fbi's bold plan to rescue him coming into sharp focus. negotiators convinced jimmy lee dykes to approach the bunker door to accept delivery of an item. there, fbi agents set off an explosive device. law enforcement officers say dykes fired on the agents. they fired back. moments later, dykes was dead and ethan was safe. the fbi and highly specialized s.w.a.t. teams spent seven days planning the raid, while hostage negotiators tried to keep dykes talking. we boarded a hall continuer here in southern alabama to get our first look at dykes' underground bunker site. you can see a number of small structures on this plot of land. but what dykes didn't know, just across the street, the fbi had recently built this mock bunker to train agents for different scenarios. >> you can practice breaching the door. you can practice how to get a camera inside. and ultimately design how you're going to assault this bunker. >> reporter: as authorities swar
me i would say 70. >> reporter: allow us to be the first to say happy birthday. >> thank you very much. >> happy birthday. a lot of americans, nearly half aren't lucky enough to have a 401(k), still one financial setback away from an emergency, but tonight economists say the market will help all of them, too, because confidence in the markets spills into american stores and shopping, hopefully, leads to jobs which is the final leg to the recovery. >> looking to the next jobs report already. >> all watching. >>> now we go to the other big headline today, the terror attack on an american embassy. a suicide bomber targeting the embassy in turkey. is this the future plan of attack for terrorists? abc's chief global affairs correspondent martha raddatz with the latest tonight. martha? >> reporter: this embassy suicide bombing happened on hillary clinton's last day as secretary of state. she was informed immediately and made calls all morning before turning her duties over to her replacement, john kerry, who tracked this all day. the blast was destructive and deadly. 1:13 in the afterno
a secret base in saudi arabia, used to launch drones throughout the region. a tactic against terror which has grown 700% under the obama administration. whatever the benefit of the drone strikes, they have created enormous resentment among some here in the region, who view the strikes as another sign of american arrogance. everywhere i travel, from yemen -- >> i think americans, they have no right. they have no right to -- this is our fight. >> reporter: to pakistan. >> you can keep saying, yes, you are hitting the top leadership, but the byproduct of this is anger, anger among people, the innocent people who are getting killed. so, you are just creating more terrorists. >> reporter: now, the man who signs off on the kill list, from a basement office in the white house, john brennan, about to be questioned in front of the world. >> i suggest to you that these targeted strikes against al qaeda terrorists are indeed ethical and just. >> reporter: in pakistan alone, there have been more than 300 drone strikes in the last decade. killing thousands of al qaeda and taliban, but more than 300 ci
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)